Archive for February, 2009

Lenten Preaching Series: Jesus and the Cross

Posted: February 25, 2009 by limabean03 in Uncategorized

MARCH 1ST:  Jesus and the Cross Part 1:  God’s eternal plan

March 1st begins our Lenten preaching series entitled “Jesus and the cross.”  Working through the five Sundays of Lent we will be looking at a different aspect of Jesus’ confrontation with death, hell, the devil and sin as he suffers on the tree at Golgotha.  Each sermon will be an exposition of scripture from the Gospel of Luke.  Our first in this series, “God’s eternal plan” is an exposition of Luke 9.18-27.  As the events of Jesus’ passion unfold, the temptation is to ask “why have things gone so horribly wrong?  When did God lose control?”  Of course, there is perhaps no point in history where the eyes are deceived to the extent that they are on Good Friday.  As the Lord suffers in agony, he reigns supreme, fulfilling an ancient plan to redeem the human race.  Our reading from Luke highlights the fact that Jesus was well aware of his eventual death on the cross.  Indeed this is why he has come.  This is pastorally significant, not only because of its theological implications for sinful humanity, but also because it demonstrates that God’s good purposes are never thwarted.  It is on the cross, when everything appears to be falling apart, that everything is actually going just as God planned it. 

 

Old Testament:  Gen 22.1-14

Psalm: Psalm 25

 

Gospel:  Luke 9.18-27 (more…)

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Preached at the Ash Wednesday Service, Feb 24th 2009. 

Culture places high value on the notion that the human heart is not only good, but that it is essentially trustworthy.  For many people the heart is the spring from which all that is good within us flows out.  We believe that the heart, the seat of our emotions is essentially good.  We are in our innermost being good people, with good intentions.  And yet we don’t stop here.  Alongside this idea that the heart is fundamentally good in a moral sense, we also believe that the heart is unique in the sense that it is a trustworthy compass pointing us in the right direction.  If you were to type in the internet bookstore Amazon.com searching for titles that include the phrase “follow your heart,” you would find over six-thousand titles.  This shows us two things:  first there are people in the world who have thought about the heart, about its goodness and trustworthiness (6,000 people!), and second there are people who are interested in reading about how good and trustworthy their hearts are.

The Bible also has many things to say about the heart.  For example, the Book of Proverbs instructs us to “Keep your heart with all vigilance, for from it flow the springs of life” (4.23).  The heart is the root of the tree, the gasoline to the car, the hinge on the door, the wood for the fire.  In other words, as “from it flow the springs of life!”  Which is why the writer instructs us to “keep it with vigilance.”  Something so important should be tended to most carefully.  Because our hearts are so important, it is no surprise that God himself is deeply concerned with the nature of our hearts.  “the Lord sees not as man sees: man looks on the outward appearance,  but the Lord looks on the heart” (1 Sam 16.7) and ““I the Lord search the heart and test the mind, to give every man according to his ways, according to the fruit of his deeds” (Jer 17.10). 

Jesus also has much to say about the heart.  Today, in this passage, though he never specifically mentions the heart he nevertheless has much to say about the heart and what he says about the heart can be summed up in one word:  “Beware.”  Beware!  It is the last thing that you would suspect would come from the mouth of gentle Jesus meek and mild about the human heart.  We expect the Lamb of God to come gently bleeting compliments and high praise for the goodness of our individual hearts.  Rather he expresses a fearfulness, withdrawing in horror as if he had seen some type of dangerous predator or a horrific car crash, recoiling he says “Beware!” (more…)

Caleb is a good friend who came to faith at Trinity while the Bishop was preaching back in June. He gave his testimony last night at our Shrove Tuesday service. Thought you might enjoy a pic of his Baptism we did back in late fall.  I invited my buddy Sami to come out there with me because he had been instrumental in leading Caleb to faith.  It was an awesome experience.  We all got pretty wet!  Some of us were smarter than others however.  You’ll notice Caleb put the wetsuit on.  Many thanks to Bob Caswell for being handy on his Palm Treo that day and getting this picture.
caleb

From left to right:  Rob Sturdy, Sami Al-Taher, Caleb Parker

I think Bridges has a lot of good things to say, espcially in his book The Discipline of Grace, which was given to all of our folks who renewed or were confirmed in the faith.  Below is an essential truth about the Christian life, namely that the Gospel is for believers too.  Too often in evangelical America we shake hands at the cross with Jesus, thank him for what he’s done then get on to the “real work” of discipleship.  These folks have never come to the cross in the first place.  It was simply a detour on their future career in legalism.  Rather the true Christian, as Bridges commends to us, stays always at the cross.  This is a timely reminder for us in the performance driven culture we all live in. 

 

Gradually over time, and from a deep sense of need, I came to realize that the gospel is for believers, too. When I finally realized this, every morning I would pray over a Scripture such as Isaiah 53:6,” All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the Lord has laid on him the iniquity of us all,” and then say, “Lord, I have gone astray. I have turned to my own way, but you have laid all my sin on Christ and because of that I approach you and feel accepted by you.”

 

I came to see that Paul’s statement in Galatians 2:20, “The life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God who loved me and gave himself for me,” was made in the context of justification (see vv. 15-21). Yet Paul was speaking in the present tense: “The life I now live ….” Because of the context, I realized Paul was not speaking about his sanctification but about his justification. For Paul, then, justification (being declared righteous by God on the basis of the righteousness of Christ) was not only a past-tense experience but also a present-day reality.

 

Paul lived every day by faith in the shed blood and righteousness of Christ. Every day he looked to Christ alone for his acceptance with the Father. He believed, like Peter (see 1 Pet. 2:4-5), that even our best deeds — our spiritual sacrifices — are acceptable to God

only through Jesus Christ. Perhaps no one apart from Jesus himself has ever been as committed a disciple both in life and ministry as the Apostle Paul. Yet he did not look to his own performance but to Christ’s “performance” as the sole basis of his acceptance with God.

 

So I learned that Christians need to hear the gospel all of their lives because it is the gospel that continues to remind us that our day-to-day acceptance with the Father is not based on what we do for God but upon what Christ did for us in his sinless life and sin-bearing death. I began to see that we stand before God today as righteous as we ever will be, even in heaven, because he has clothed us with the righteousness of his Son. Therefore, I don’t have to perform to be accepted by God. Now I am free to obey him and serve him because I am already accepted in Christ (see Rom. 8:1). My driving motivation now is not guilt but gratitude.

 

read it all here

Christian Robert Chaney

Posted: February 10, 2009 by limabean03 in Trinity Tidings
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Mark and Kris have a new son! And Will is now a big brother. We’re obviously very excited about the new addition to the Chaney family and expect him to be leading Sunday worship on the organ or some other suitable instrument within three months.

christian-robert-chaney

Christian Robert Chaney
Born 9:35 am, Wednesday, February 4, 2009
Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
6 lb, 11 oz, 19 inches long

Preached 2.08.09

“All men seek happiness. This is without exception. Whatever different means they employ, they all tend to this end. The cause of some going to war, and of others avoiding it, is the same desire in both, attended with different views. The will never takes the least step but to this object. This is the motive of every action of every man, even of those who hang themselves.” –Blaise Paschal Pensees VII.1.425

Paschal’s quote from Pensees is useful for the fact that it reminds us of something that every inch of our current era strains to help us forget, namely, that you and I are desiring creatures.  What do we desire?  Essentially we desire, Paschal says, to be happy.  Our hearts desire our happiness, our minds conceive of what might make us happy, and our bodies strain to achieve this end.  It is out of a desiring heart, that our mind say “going to the mall today will make me happy,” so our bodies strain to the mall.  It is out of the desiring heart that our mind says “watching House tonight will make me happy,” so my body strains to watch House, even if I’m tired or have other responsibilities.  We are desiring creatures and we always do what we desire and what satisfies us in the end. 

Why do we behave this way?  Well, we behave this way in short because we believe that there is something out there that will eventually satisfy our desire.  Of course the comeback is, just because I think there is something out there, doesn’t mean it exists.  I could imagine a pristine island in the South Pacific that has a sign on the beach that says “reserved for Rob Sturdy” and it doesn’t mean it exists.  But, on the other hand, a baby who is newly born, who desires food desires the food because he was made to consume it.  So, while it doesn’t necessarily prove it, I think it is a strong argument that a desire to be in heaven after we die, to have communion with God, to have a transcendent purpose in life, is a reasonably strong argument that such things exist. (more…)