Archive for the ‘Christian Theology’ Category

by Michael J. Kruger

 

1. “The New Testament Books are the Earliest Christian Writings We Possess
2. “Apocryphal Writings Are All Written in the Second Century or Later
3.“The New Testament Books Are Unique Because They Are Apostolic Books
4.”Some NT Writers Quote Other NT Writers as Scripture
5.“The Four Gospels are Well Established by the End of the Second Century
6.“At the End of the Second Century, the Muratorian Fragment lists 22 of Our 27 NT Books
7.“Early Christians Often Used Non-Canonical Writings
8.“The NT Canon Was Not Decided at Nicea—Nor Any Other Church Council
9. “Christians Did Disagree about the Canonicity of Some NT Books
10. “Early Christians Believed that Canonical Books Were Self-Authenticating

 

HT:ReformationTHeology

The object and cause of faith

Posted: July 22, 2013 by doulos tou Theou in Christianity, Spurgeon

The cross which is the object of faith, is also, by the power of the Holy Spirit, the cause of it. Sit down and watch the dying Savior till faith springs up spontaneously in your heart. There is no place like Calvary for creating confidence. The air of that sacred hill brings health to trembling faith.

— Charles SpurgeonAll of Grace(Chicago, Il.: Moody Press, n.d.), 75

 

 

HT:OFI

Gladness in the gospel

Posted: July 16, 2013 by doulos tou Theou in Christianity, Discipleship, Puritan Faith

Truth will readily be exchanged for error when no more sweetness and joy is to be found in it than is to be found in error. When we find any of the good truths of the gospel coming home to our souls with power, giving us gladness of heart and transforming us into the image and likeness of it, the Holy Spirit is then at his work. He is pouring out his oil.

— John OwenCommunion with God, ed. R. J. K. Law(Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1991), 189

 

 

HT:OFI

How to fight for truth

Posted: July 15, 2013 by doulos tou Theou in Christianity, Discipleship, Puritan Faith

“When the heart is cast into the mold of the doctrine which the mind embraces, . . . when not the sense of the words but of the things is in our hearts, when we have communion with God in the doctrine we contend for, then shall we be garrisoned by the grace of God against all the assaults of men.  Without this, all our contending is of no value to ourselves.  What am I the better, if I can dispute that Christ is God but have no sense that he is a God in covenant with my soul? . . . It is possible to contend for truth in a spirit most opposite to its nature, and most warmly to advocate the rights of a cause from which we ourselves may derive no benefit.  In all cases, it should be remembered, that the wrath of man works not the righteousness of God.”

John Owen, in The Works of John Owen, edited by Thomas Russell (London, 1826), I:164-165.

 

from Ray Orlund’s blog

Childlike confidence

Posted: July 10, 2013 by doulos tou Theou in Christianity, Spurgeon

Very much of prayer is to be highly commended for its reverence, but it has in it a lack of childlike confidence. I can admire the solemn and stately language of worship that recognizes the greatness of God, but it will not warm my heart or express my soul until it has also blended therewith the joyful nearness of that perfect love that casts out fear and ventures to speak with our Father in heaven as a child speaks with its father on earth.

— Charles Spurgeon“The Rent Veil”

 

HT:OFI

Jesus is alive and well

Posted: July 1, 2013 by doulos tou Theou in Apologetics, Biblical Theology, Christianity, Discipleship

Today Jesus is alive and well, seated on a throne at the right hand of God the Father being worshiped as God by angels and departed saints.

Today Jesus alone rules and reigns in exalted glory as Lord over man and beast, male and female, gays and straights, young and old, rich and poor, black and white, simple and wise, powerful and powerless, Republicans and Democrats, married and single, chaste and unchaste, modern and postmodern, Christians and non-Christians, angels and demons, the living and the dead, every religion, every spirituality, every philosophy, every thought, every word, every deed, every dollar, and every inch of creation, which he claims as his possession under his throne that is over all.

Mark Driscoll & Gary Brashears, “Vintage Jesus

Ht : ofi

The Gospel is the Food of Faith

Posted: June 26, 2013 by doulos tou Theou in Christianity, Reformed Theology

“The new life in Christ, just like all natural life, must be nourished and strengthened. This is possible only in communion with Christ in the Holy Spirit and through the word of Scripture. Enlightened by the Spirit, believers gain a new knowledge of faith. The gospel is the food of faith and must be known to be nourishment. Salvation that is not known and enjoyed is no salvation. God saves by causing himself to be known and enjoyed in Christ.”

— Herman Bavinck, Reformed Dogmatics, Volume 4: Holy Spirit, Church, and New Creation(Grand Rapids, Mi.: Baker Academic, 2008), 96

from Pastor Jared Wilson ‘s blog

Christ cursed for us

Posted: June 26, 2013 by doulos tou Theou in Christianity, Spurgeon

God cannot look where there is sin with any pleasure, and though as far as Jesus is personally concerned, he is the Father’s beloved Son in whom he is well pleased; yet when he saw sin laid upon his Son, he made that Son cry, ‘My God! my God! why hast thou forsaken me?’

It was not possible that Jesus should enjoy the light of his Father’s presence while he was made sin for us; consequently he went through a horror of great darkness, the root and source of which was the withdrawing of the conscious enjoyment of the Father’s presence. More than that, not only was light withdrawn, but positive sorrow was inflicted. God must punish sin, and though sin was not Christ’s by his actually doing it, yet it was laid upon him, and therefore he was made a curse for us … God only knows the griefs to which the Son of God was put when the Lord made to meet upon him the iniquity of us all. To crown all there was death itself.

— Charles Spurgeon, quoted by Steve Jeffery, et al. inPierced for Our Transgressions (Wheaton, Ill.: Crossway Books, 2007), 194

 

HT:OFI

Blood-sprinkled words

Posted: June 20, 2013 by doulos tou Theou in Christianity, Discipleship, Spurgeon

If the mark of his blood is upon any word, thou needest never doubt it. If he has died, how canst thou perish? If he has bidden thee come, how can he cast thee out? If thou dost rest upon his finished work, how canst thou be condemned? Believe, I pray thee, and rest thee on the blood-sprinkled words of this wondrousBook.

— Charles Spurgeon“Words to Rest On”

 

 

Ht:OFI

a quote by John Calvin from Kevin DeYoung’s blog

John Calvin:

Now this, also, ought to be added, that although either fatherly favor and beneficence or severity of judgment often shine forth in the whole course of providence, nevertheless sometimes the causes of the events are hidden.

So the thought creeps in that human affairs turn and whirl at the blind urge of fortune; or the flesh incites us to contradiction, as if God were making sport of men by throwing them like balls. It is, indeed, true that if we had quiet and composed minds ready to learn, the final outcome would show that God always has the best reason for his plan:

either to instruct his own people in patience,

or to correct their wicked affections and tame their lust,

or to subjugate them to self-denial,

or to rouse them from sluggishness;

again, to bring low the proud, to shatter the cunning of the impious and to overthrow their devices.

Yet however hidden and fugitive from our point of view the causes may be, we must hold that they are surely laid up with him, and hence we must exclaim with David: “Great, O God, are the wondrous deeds that thou hast done, and thy thoughts toward us cannot be reckoned; if I try to speak, they would be more than can be told” [Ps. 40:5].

(Institutes of the Christian Religion, 1.17.1)

 

The redeemed have all their objective good in God. God himself is the great good which they are brought to the possession and enjoyment of by redemption. He is the highest good, and the sum of all that good which Christ has purchased. God is the inheritance of the saints; he is the portion of their souls. God is their wealth and treasure, their food, their life, their dwelling place, their ornament and diadem, and their everlasting honor and glory. They have none in heaven but God; he is the great good which the redeemed are received to at death, and which they are to rise to at the end of the world.

The Lord God, he is the light of the heavenly Jerusalem; and is the ‘the river of the water of life’ that runs, and the tree of life that grows, ‘in the midst of the paradise of God.’ The glorious excellencies and beauty of God will be what will forever entertain the minds of the saints, and the love of God will be their everlasting feast. The redeemed will indeed enjoy other things; they will enjoy the angels, and will enjoy one another: but that which they shall enjoy in the angels, or each other, or in anything else whatsoever, that will yield them delight and happiness, will be what will be seen of God in them.

— Jonathan Edwards”God Glorified in the Work of Redemption” in The Sermons of Jonathan Edwards: A Reader, ed. Wilson H. Kimnach, et al74-75

 

HT:OFI

Made New by Grace

Posted: June 5, 2013 by doulos tou Theou in Christianity, Discipleship, Spurgeon

“The grace of God constrains men to become Christians, and yet only constrains them consistently with the laws of their mind. The freedom of the will is as great a truth as the predestination of God. The grace of God, without violating our wills, makes men willing in the day of God’s power, and they give themselves to Jesus Christ.

You cannot be a Christian against your will. How could it be? A servant of God against his will! A child of God against his will! Nay, it never was so, and it never shall be so.”

– C. H. Spurgeon

A new creature in Christ

Posted: May 31, 2013 by doulos tou Theou in Christianity, Discipleship, Puritan Faith

If I am a new creature in Christ, then I stand before God, not in myself—but in Christ. He sees no longer me—but only him in whom I am—him who represents me, Christ Jesus, my substitute and surety. In believing, I have become so identified with the Son of his love, that the favor with which he regards him passes over to me, and rests, like the sunshine of the new heavens, upon me.

In Christ, and through Christ, I have acquired a new standing before the Father. I am ‘accepted in the beloved.’

My old standing, that is, that of distance, and disfavor, and condemnation, is wholly removed, and I am brought into one of nearness, and acceptance, and pardon—I am made to occupy a new footing, just as if my old one had never been. Old guilt, heavy as the mountain, vanishes; old dread, gloomy as midnight, passes off; old fear, dark as hell, gives place to the joyful confidence arising from forgiveness and reconciliation, and the complete blotting out of sin.

All things are made new. I have changed my standing before God; and that simply in consequence of that oneness between me and Christ, which has been established, through my believing the record given concerning him. I come to him on a new footing, for I am “in Christ,” and in me there has been a new creation.

— Horatius Bonar“Christ and the New Creation”

 

HT:OFI

“To the rescue!”

Posted: May 22, 2013 by doulos tou Theou in Christianity, Discipleship, Spurgeon

I give my sheep eternal life, and they will never perish, and no one will snatch them out of my hand.  John 10:28

“Some will tell us that a man may receive spiritual life, and yet may die eternally.  That is to say, a man may be forgiven, and yet be punished afterwards.  He may be justified from all sin, and yet after that his transgression can be laid on his shoulders again.  A man may be born of God, and yet die.  A man may be loved of God, and yet God may hate him tomorrow. . . . As for me, I so deeply believe in the immutable love of Jesus that I suppose that if one believer were to be in hell, Christ himself would not long stay in heaven but would cry, ‘To the rescue!’”

Charles Haddon Spurgeon, “The Two Effects of the Gospel,” 27 May 1855.

 

 

from Ray Ortlunds blog

“Some people seem to be afraid lest we should be the means of saving some of the non-elect—but that is a fear which never troubles either my head or my heart, for I know that with all the effort and preaching in the world, we shall never bring more to Christ than Christ has had given to Him by His Father!”

– C.H. Spurgeon